What are the Symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome?

Patients with dry eye often complain of irritation, dryness, scratching, burning, aching, or a feeling that something is in the eye. The eyes may become fatigued or “tired,” especially with reading or TV watching. The vision may blur off and on during the day. At times, the eyes may even fill up with watery tears despite being “dry.”

Many patients with dry eye have no symptoms, but show clinical signs on a doctor’s exam. As dry eye gets worse, the nerves on the ocular surface can fail to transmit signals to the brain, leaving patients unaware of the extent of their condition.

Scroll down to learn about MGD.

What are the Symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome?

Patients with dry eye often complain of irritation, dryness, scratching, burning, aching, or a feeling that something is in the eye. The eyes may become fatigued or “tired,” especially with reading or TV watching. The vision may blur off and on during the day. At times, the eyes may even fill up with watery tears despite being “dry.”

Many patients with dry eye have no symptoms, but show clinical signs on a doctor’s exam. As dry eye gets worse, the nerves on the ocular surface can fail to transmit signals to the brain, leaving patients unaware of the extent of their condition.

Scroll down to learn about MGD.

What are the
Symptoms of
Dry Eye
Syndrome?

Patients with dry eye often complain of irritation, dryness, scratching, burning, aching, or a feeling that something is in the eye. The eyes may become fatigued or “tired,” especially with reading or TV watching. The vision may blur off and on during the day. At times, the eyes may even fill up with watery tears despite being “dry.”

Many patients with dry eye have no symptoms, but show clinical signs on a doctor’s exam. As dry eye gets worse, the nerves on the ocular surface can fail to transmit signals to the brain, leaving patients unaware of the extent of their condition.

Scroll down to learn about MGD.

What is “MGD,” and how is it related to Dry Eye Syndrome?

Our tears are normally protected by a healthy oil coating, which is produced by eyelid oil glands (Meibomian glands). These glands can become blocked by unhealthy, thickened oils. This condition is called Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, or “MGD.” MGD may be present in over 85% of dry eye patients.

MGD leads to oil-deficient “watery” tears that evaporate too quickly, causing dry eye syndrome. If MGD is left untreated, it tends to get worse over time. Blocked glands can become damaged severely enough that they permanently fail to function.

Aqueous Tear Deficiency, which is a less-common dry eye condition affecting the watery portion of the tears, can accompany MGD, or can occur independently of it.

Scroll down to learn about Blepharitis.

What is “MGD,” and how is it related to Dry Eye Syndrome?

Our tears are normally protected by a healthy oil coating, which is produced by eyelid oil glands (Meibomian glands). These glands can become blocked by unhealthy, thickened oils. This condition is called Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, or “MGD.” MGD may be present in over 85% of dry eye patients.

MGD leads to oil-deficient “watery” tears that evaporate too quickly, causing dry eye syndrome. If MGD is left untreated, it tends to get worse over time. Blocked glands can become damaged severely enough that they permanently fail to function.

Aqueous Tear Deficiency, which is a less-common dry eye condition affecting the watery portion of the tears, can accompany MGD, or can occur independently of it.

Scroll down to learn about Blepharitis.

What is
“MGD?”

Our tears are normally protected by a healthy oil coating, which is produced by eyelid oil glands (Meibomian glands). These glands can become blocked by unhealthy, thickened oils. This condition is called Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, or “MGD.” MGD may be present in over 85% of dry eye patients.

MGD leads to oil-deficient “watery” tears that evaporate too quickly, causing dry eye syndrome. If MGD is left untreated, it tends to get worse over time. Blocked glands can become damaged severely enough that they permanently fail to function.

Aqueous Tear Deficiency, which is a less-common dry eye condition affecting the watery portion of the tears, can accompany MGD, or can occur independently of it.

Scroll down to learn about Blepharitis.

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that often leads to redness, discharge, crusting, “styes,” and other problems. Itching and burning are common symptoms.  Blepharitis often overlaps with MGD, and it is frequently accompanied by an eyelid overgrowth of microscopic bacteria.

A common type of these bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) is illustrated here in magnified form.

go to "why eyelid therapy is important" (next page down)

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that often leads to redness, discharge, crusting, “styes,” and other problems. Itching and burning are common symptoms.  Blepharitis often overlaps with MGD, and it is frequently accompanied by an eyelid overgrowth of microscopic bacteria.

A common type of these bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) is illustrated here in magnified form.

go to "why eyelid therapy is important" (next page down)

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that often leads to redness, discharge, crusting, “styes,” and other problems. Itching and burning are common symptoms.  Blepharitis often overlaps with MGD, and it is frequently accompanied by an eyelid overgrowth of microscopic bacteria.

A common type of these bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) is illustrated here in magnified form.

go to "why eyelid therapy is important" (next page down)